Bitcoin mining with AMD Radeon GPUs TweakTown

AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 GPU, NEW, Fastest bitcoin mining, graphics video card

AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 GPU, NEW, Fastest bitcoin mining, graphics video card submitted by DeadMan3000 to Amd [link] [comments]

AMD XfX Radeon HD 5870 video card Teardown - used for Bitcoin / altcoin mining

AMD XfX Radeon HD 5870 video card Teardown - used for Bitcoin / altcoin mining submitted by Tekkerr to Nerdiasme [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 GPU, NEW, Fastest bitcoin mining, graphics video card /r/Amd

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 GPU, NEW, Fastest bitcoin mining, graphics video card /Amd submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

ELI5: How does an asic bitcoin miner work? Why are some video cards (Radeons) work more efficiently than others?

Super curious on this one. Really want to know why people shell out like $2500 for one miner.
submitted by ProbablyHighAsShit to explainlikeimfive [link] [comments]

XFX ATI Radeon HD 5870 1GB Video Card -DOES NOT WORK- is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-5870-1gb-video-card-does-not-work/

submitted by duetschpire to cryptothrift [link] [comments]

Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 Video Card w/ Boost 11196-16 is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/sapphire-radeon-hd-7950-video-card-w-boost-11196-16/

Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 Video Card w/ Boost 11196-16 is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/sapphire-radeon-hd-7950-video-card-w-boost-11196-16/ submitted by duetschpire to cryptothrift [link] [comments]

XFX ATI Radeon HD 5870 1GB Video Card -DOES NOT WORK- is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-5870-1gb-does-not-work/

XFX ATI Radeon HD 5870 1GB Video Card -DOES NOT WORK- is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/computer-hardware/xfx-ati-radeon-hd-5870-1gb-does-not-work/ submitted by duetschpire to cryptothrift [link] [comments]

About Ethereum mining pitfalls, risks, and threats

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to ethereum [link] [comments]

What I currently use for privacy (after almost 2 years of long investing into it)

First of all, my threat model: I'm just an average person that wants to AVOID the maximum I can to be monitored and tracked by the government and big corps, a lot of people out there REALLY hate me and I've gone through lots of harassment and other stuff, I also plan to take my activism and love for freedom more seriously and to do stuff that could potentially lead me to very high danger or even put my life on the line. That being said, my main focus is on something that is privacy-friendly but also something with decent security (no point having a lot of privacy if a script kiddie can just break into it an boom, everything is gone) anonymity is also desirable but I'm pretty aware that true 100% anonymity is simply not possible and to achieve the maximum you can of it currently you'd have to give up A LOT of stuff in which I don't think I really could. So basically, everything that I said + I don't want to give up some hobbies of mine (as playing games etc)
Here's what I use/have done so far, most of it is based on privacytools.io list and research I've done.
Mobile:
Google Pixel 3a XL running GrapheneOS
Apps: Stock apps (Vanadium, Gallery, Clock, Contacts etc) + F-DROID, NewPipe, OsmAnd+, Joplin, Tutanota, K-9 Mail, Aegis Authenticator, KeePassDX, Syncthing, Signal, Librera PRO, Vinyl, Open Camera and Wireguard.
I also use BlahDNS as my private DNS.
Other smartphone stuff/habits: I use a Supershieldz Anti Spy Tempered Glass Screen Protector on my phone and I also have a Faraday Sleeve from Silent Pocket which my phone is on most of the times (I don't have smartphone addiction and would likely advice you to break free from smartphone addiction if you have it). I NEVER use bluetooth (thank god Pixel 3a have a headphone jack so yeah, no bluetooth earphones here) and always keep my Wi-Fi off if I'm not using it.
Computer:
I have a desktop that I built (specs: Asus B450M Gaming, AMD Ryzen 3 3300X, Radeon RX 580 8GB, 16GB DDR4 2666Mhz, 3TB HDD, 480GB SSD) that is dualbooted with QubesOS and Arch Linux.
Qubes is my main OS that I use as daily driver and for my tasks, I use Arch for gaming.
I've installed linux-hardened and its headers packages on my Arch + further kernel hardening using systctl and boot parameters, AppArmor as my MAC system and bubblewrap for sandboxing programs. I also spoof my MAC address and have restricted root access, I've also protected my GRUB with password (and use encrypted boot) and have enabled Microcode updates and have NTP and IPV6 disabled.
Also on Arch, I use iptables as a firewall denying all incoming traffic, and since it's my gaming PC, I don't game on the OS, instead, I use a KVM/QEMU Windows VM for gaming (search "How I Built The "Poor-Shamed" Computer" video to see what I'm talking about) I also use full disk encryption.
Software/Providers:
E-Mails: I use ProtonMail (Plus Account paid with bitcoin) and Tutanota (free account as they don't accept crypto payment yet, come on Tutanota, I've been waiting for it for 2 years already) since I have plus account on ProtonMail it allows me to use ProtonMail Bridge and use it on Claws Mail (desktop) and K-9 Mail (mobile) as for Tutanota I use both desktop and mobile app.
Some other e-mails habits of mine: I use e-mail aliases (ProtonMail plus account provides you with 5) and each alias is used for different tasks (as one for shopping, one for banking, one for accounts etc) and none of my e-mails have my real name on it or something that could be used to identify me. I also highly avoid using stuff that require e-mail/e-mail verification for usage (e-mail is such a pain in the ass tbh) I also make use of Spamgourmet for stuff like temporary e-mail (best service I found for this doing my research, dunno if it's really the best tho, heard that AnonAddy does kinda the same stuff but dunno, recommendations are welcomed)
Browsers/Search Engine: As mentioned, I use Vanadium (Graphene's stock browser) on mobile as it is the recommended browser by Graphene and the one with the best security for Android, for desktop I use a Hardened Firefox (pretty aware of Firefox's security not being that good, but it's the best browser for PC for me as Ungoogled Chromium is still not there in A LOT of things + inherent problems of Chrome as not being able to disable WebRTC unless you use an extension etc) with ghacks-user.js and uBlock Origin (hard mode), uMatrix (globally blocking first party scripts), HTTPS Everywhere (EASE Mode), Decentraleyes (set the recommended rules for both uBlock Origin and uMatrix) and Temporary Containers as addons. I also use Tor Browser (Safest Mode) on a Whonix VM on Qubes sometimes. DuckDuckGo is my to-go search engine and I use DNS over HTTPS on Firefox (BlahDNS as my provider once again)
browsing habits: I avoid JavaScript the maximum I can, if it's really needed, I just allow the scripts temporarely on uBlock Origin/uMatrix and after I'm done I just disable it. I also generally go with old.reddit.com instead of reddit.com (as JavaScript is not required to browse the old client), nitter.net for checking twitter stuff (although I rarely have something peaking my interest on Twitter) and I use invidious.snopyta.org as youtube front-end (I do however use YouTube sometimes if a video I wanna see can't be played on invidious or if I wanna watch a livestream) and html.duckduckgo.com instead of duckduckgo.com other than avoiding JavaScript most of my browsing habits are just common sense at this point I'd say, I also use privatebin (snopyta's instance) instead of pastebin. I also have multiple firefox profiles for different tasks (personal usage, shopping, banking etc)
VPN: I use Mullvad (guess you can mention it here since it's PTIO's recommended) paid with bitcoin and honestly best service available tbh. I use Mullvad's multihop implementation on Wireguard which I manually set myself as I had the time and patience to learn how.
password manager: KeePassXC on desktop and KeePassDX on my smartphone, my password database for my desktop is stored on a USB flash driver I encrypted with VeraCrypt.
some other software on desktop: LibreOffice (as a Microsoft Office substitute), GIMP (Photshop substitute), Vim (I use it for multiple purposes, mainly coding IDE and as a text editor), VLC (media player), Bisq (bitcoin exchange), Wasabi (bitcoin wallet), OBS (screen recording), Syncthing (file sync), qBitTorrent (torrent client) and Element (federated real-time communication software). I sadly couldn't find a good open-source substitute to Sony Vegas (tested many, but none was in the same level of Vegas imo, KDENLive is okay tho) so I just use it on a VM if I need it (Windows VM solely for the purpose of video editing, not the same one I use for gaming)
Other:
router: I have an Asus RT-AC68U with OpenWRT as its firmware. I also set a VPN on it.
cryptocurrency hardware wallet: I store all of my cryptocurrency (Bitcoin and Monero) on a Ledger Nano S, about 97% of my money is on crypto so a hardware wallet is a must for me.
I have lots of USB flash drivers that I use for Live ISOs and for encrypted backups. I also have a USB Data Blocker from PortaPow that I generally use if I need to charge my cellphone in public or in a hotel while on a trip (rare occasion tbh).
I have a Logitech C920e as webcam and a Blue Yeti microphone in which I never let them plugged, I only plug them if it's necessary and after I'm done I just unplug them.
I also have a Nintendo Switch Lite as a gaming console that I most of the times just use offline, I just connect to the internet if needed for a software update and then just turn the Wi-Fi off from it.
Other Habits/Things I've done:
payments: I simply AVOID using credit card, I try to always pay on cash (I live in a third-world country so thank god most of people here still depend on cash only) physically and online I try my best to either by using cryptocurrency or using gift cards/cash by mail if crypto isn't available. I usually buy crypto on Bisq as I just don't trust any KYC exchange (and neither should you) and since there aren't many people here in my area to do face to face bitcoin trade (and I'm skeptical of face to face tbh), I use the Wasabi Wallet (desktop) to coinjoin bitcoin before buying anything as this allows a bit more of privacy, I also coinjoin on Wasabi before sending my bitcoins to my hardware wallet. I also don't have a high consumerism drive so I'm not constantly wanting to buy everything that I see (which helps a lot on this criteria)
social media/accounts: as noted, aside from Signal and Element (which I don't even use that often) I just don't REALLY use any social media (tried Mastodon for a while but I was honestly felt it kinda desert there and most of its userbase from what I've seen were some people I'd just... rather don't hang with tbh) and, althoug not something necessary is something that I really advise people to as social media is literally a poison to your mind.
I also don't own any streaming service like Netflix/Amazon Prime/Spotify etc, I basically pirate series/movies/songs and that's it.
I've also deleted ALL my old accounts from social media (like Twitter etc) and old e-mails. ALL of my important and main accounts have 2FA enabled and are protected by a strong password (I use KeePass to generate a 35 character lenght password with numbers, capital letters, special symbols etc, each account uses a unique password) I also NEVER use my real name on any account and NEVER post any pictures of myself (I rarely take pictures of stuff if anything)
iot/smart devices: aside from my smartphone, I don't have any IOT/smart device as I honestly see no need for them (and most of them are WAY too expensive on third-world countries)
files: I constatly backup all of my files (each two weeks) on encrypted flash drivers, I also use BleachBit for temporary data cleaning and data/file shredding. I also use Syncthing as a substitute to stuff like Google Drive.
Future plans:
learn to self-host and self-host an e-mail/NextCloud (and maybe even a VPN)
find something like BurneHushed but FOSS (if you know any please let me know)
So, how is it? anything that I should do that I'm probably not doing?
submitted by StunningDistrust to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

Ethereum mining pitfalls, risks, and threats

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to gpumining [link] [comments]

Mining pitfalls, risks, and threats in Ethereum network

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

About problems of Ethereum miners

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Ethereum mining pitfalls, risks, and threats

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to Metaverse_Blockchain [link] [comments]

Micro-stuttering with Sapphire RX 570 8GB Nitro +

I just got this gpu from ebay. The seller claims that it's new and it does look new but it has its dvd drivers missing. After I installed the gpu to my new desktop (motherboard GA-A320M-H (rev. 1.1) updated to the latest bios and using Windows 10) and installed the drivers the card had an exclamation mark on device manager and also the Radeon software was saying that there is no card installed. After some googling I read a forum discussion where they were saying that cards that have been used for bitcoin mining face this issue and a third-party patch fixes it. I used the patch and it worked. The exclamation mark went away and the radeon software seems to work properly. Games work etc etc.
The issue is that with Microsoft Edge watching Netflix causes some very small stuttering issue. Especially when the subtitles are turned on. The movement isn't smooth and it looks like it has a split of second lag sometimes. Something similar happens when I play video files with VLC and especially when I move my mouse and the control menu appears.
Do you think there is an issue with the card (as altered BIOS for mining) or it's a matter of settings? Why the drivers don't work without the patch? I don't think that's normal especially if you buy a brand new card and not second hand. Does anyone have a solution for the stuttering or I should just return the card and get my money back?
submitted by georgekech to radeon [link] [comments]

Building an Ethereum Mining Rig - Part 2

First update to the guide "Building a 6Gpu Mining Rig for Ethereum" - Let's talk about Claymore.
This update supplements and does not replace the Guide to Build a 6GPU Mining Rig for Ethereum published on our site.

The substantial differences are due to the installation of the latest version of the Windows 10 Operating System, the mining on the Ethermine pool (in our opinion simpler than Dwarfpool) and the use of the XFX RX 580 8gb GPUs.

The first variant is found in Part 4 of the guide: the environment variables are not to be entered as they will be integrated directly into the bat file to start mining.

The second variant is found in Part 7 of the guide and leads us to "mine" on a different pool using the Claymore software.
Download the latest version at the following link: https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner

Once downloaded, unzip everything on a folder on your desktop and open the start.bat file with notepad. Clear the contents and copy the following command:

start config.dll -epool eu1.ethermine.org:14444 -ewal "your ETH wallet address" -epsw x -worker "worker"
EthDcrMiner64.exe

Where instead of "your wallet address" you will have to put your Ethererum wallet - obviously without the quotes - and instead of worker you will put an identification number in case you build more RIGs (such as RIG1, RIG2, etc ...). We opted for the eu1 pool even if some on the discussion forums believe that the us1 is more profitable.

At the following link, many other useful commands for your Rig:
https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner


The Ethermine pool offers a very well crafted and descriptive interface. In the Payouts section, after only 5 minutes of mining, you can decide the minimum amount of Ether to be transferred to your wallet by simply entering the IP address of the RIG.

We have decided to mine directly on the Ethereum address of our Exodus wallet. It is not recommended to mine directly on Coinbase, as reported on the site itself. Sin.

Nothing should be left to chance when you decide to build a mining rig for Ethereum.
The third variant is the most difficult of all. Once you have reached Part 5 of the guide, you can decide whether to continue or follow this update / variant. If you are here it is probably because you have run into some problem that the guide does not allow you to solve.

With the latest version of Windows 10, you may run into a kernel conflict between the operating system and AMD's Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition Beta for Blockchain Compute drivers. This conflict will prevent you from using Atiflash after installing the drivers.

Important: Before making any changes to the BIOS, please backup each GPU.

Important: first of all flash the GPUs with the original bios if for any reason you are forced to reinstall the operating system.


Still on Atiflash.
The advice would therefore be to flash the GPUs and then install the AMD drivers. Let's say it would be because you may run into another problem this time related to the GPUs themselves. Since each video card is different from any other, the bios mod of the GPU could crash the operating system showing the classic blue screen and displaying an error related to the Atimkdag.sys file.

This could be due to the fact that some GPUs have significantly higher performance in the calculation phase than others. We could call it a factory overclock but not using them for gaming we cannot say it with absolute certainty.

Having assessed these two drawbacks, the only safe solution is to flash all the GPUs, disconnect them except for the first one, install the Blockchain drivers (plus Atimkdag patch) and launch the mining command verifying that the operating system does not go into crash in the next 5 minutes.

Turn off the rig again and connect the second GPU so on up to the sixth. In the event that one or more video cards should crash the system, disconnect them. After that, it uses DDU from the provisional mode and flashes these GPUs with their original bios. At this point, connect them again, reinstall the Blockcain drivers (plus Atimkdag patch) and start mining definitively.

All the operations related to the use of Atiflash, DDU and driver installation are reported in Part 5 and Part 6 of our guide.
A little bit of Overclocking.
You will certainly find significant differences in performance between the GPUs.

At this point all that remains is to "operate" with an overclocking software. We opt for OverdriveNtool. Our constantly updated guide is available at the following link: https://www.cryptoall.it/2019/10/12/complete-guide-to-overdriventool/

Link to the official YouTube channel for verification: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdE9TTHAOtyKxy59rALSprA

GPUs with modified bios will not leave much room for modification. You will have to proceed with the most extreme overclocking on those that mount the original bios; obviously always in small steps by saving the profile for each GPU. Our guide explains in detail how to do it.

Hoping to have been of help, we give everyone an appointment for the second part of the update on how to build an Ethereum mining rig in which we will explain in detail the dual mining on the Ethermine pool.

See you soon.


If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

Bitcoin: 1Ld9b165ZYHZcY9eUQmL9UjwzcphRE5S8Z
Ethereum: 0x8D7E456A11f4D9bB9e6683A5ac52e7DB79DBbEE7
Litecoin: LamSRc1jmwgx5xwDgzZNoXYd6ENczUZViK
Stellar: GBLDIRIQWRZCN5IXPIKYFQOE46OG2SI7AFVWFSLAHK52MVYDGVJ6IXGI
Ripple: rUb8v4wbGWYrtXzUpj7TxCFfUWgfvym9xf

By: cryptoall.it Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75 Netbox Browser: https://netbox.global/PZn5A
submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

Complete Guide to OverdriveNTool

We present the complete guide to overclocking GPUs with OverdriveNTool for your Ethereum Mining Rig! In this special we will write a complete guide to OverdriveNTool, in our opinion the most efficient, fast and immediate software for overclocking GPUs dedicated to mining.
The interface is presented in a very simple and no-frills way, as if to suggest how much the program was created to go directly to the purpose.
We remind you that after installing the drivers (see our guide to build a 6 GPU Ethereum Mining Rig) you will need to go through the Radeon Settings (Radeon Settings), select Game, Global Settings and for each GPU in your mining rig (or mining rig) you will need to make sure that HBCC memory is disabled. Do the same with the Crossfire option, checking that it is also disabled. Reboot the system and verify that all video cards have indeed not enabled HBCC and Crossfire before proceeding.
At the following link the software download and technical specifications: https://forums.guru3d.com/threads/overdriventool-tool-for-amd-gpus.416116/
Recall that the GPUs in Atiflash will numerically correspond to the GPUs in ONT and Claymore, without misalignment.
First we open our BIOS previously modified with Bios Polaris or, possibly, a stable Bios Mod downloaded from specialized sites such as Anorak via ONT. However, we can also overclock the original Bios of the GPU. Follow the OverdriveNTool guide carefully when operating at these levels!
Click on New to create a new profile for the selected GPU. At first you will find yourself on the 0 which will correspond to the 0 in Atiflash and Claymore. I repeat once again: identical GPUs can behave differently; for this reason, the most stable final overclocking may vary from card to card. It will be sufficient to load the first profile on each subsequent tab, select New, make the necessary changes and save it with a different name (possibly recognizable, such as GPU1-OC Memory or GPU2-Temp, etc ...).
The stages of the GPU and Ram. On the left we find the stages or clocks of the GPU with relative voltage for each sector. Some users disable the first 6 stages (from P1 to P6) to ensure that once the command for the minion is executed, the GPU immediately goes to the last stage. For those who, like us, restart the RIG once every 2 or 3 days, or even more, it is an unnecessary procedure.
We recommend, at least for the first tests, to leave them activated. Once you have reached the limit of the video card, you can check whether disabling them will bring some improvement in terms of hashing on the screen without the pool being affected. Because in effect our goal is to have a high hash-rate and with a minimum percentage of errors on the pool even at the expense of a lower hash-rate in our RIG.
In the central part we find the speed of the memory divided into 3 sectors. We will operate directly on the latter.
On the right you can see the speed of the fans, the temperature that the fans must maintain (in our bios-mode it is set at 75 ° to which we obviously never arrived), the acoustic limit (in a RIG it is a parameter to always keep consideration).
The last section at the bottom right, the Power, is divided into the maximum reachable temperature (with our Pulse set at 84 ° while with the XFX at 75 °) and the Power Target, strictly linked to the modified Bios that we are overclocking . You can try at the end of all tests, in the event of instability of one or more GPUs, to give less power starting from -25%.
In this guide we will refer to the XFX RX 580 8GB GDDR5, with GPU clock at 1200Mhz and Memory at 2150Mhz. 8 video cards theoretically identical in total.
Let's put into practice what has been written up to now ...
We immediately opted for blocking the stages by operating directly on the latter for both the GPU Clock and the RAM. From these levels it starts to drop with the voltage of both the GPU and the RAM, alternatively always checking hashing, consumption and the stability of the system (usually 5-10 minutes are enough). When the voltage is too low, the GPU will not start undermining.

The goal is to obtain the best performance / consumption ratio, always parameterizing the results obtained on the pool. A very high hashrate or very low consumption can often create numerous errors in the mining phase.


With 8 RX580 8GB video cards we reached a total consumption (thus including all the components of the RIG) of 770 Watts for an average of less than 100 Watts per GPU.

The result was achieved by bringing the GPU clock voltage to 1000 and the RAM to 900. Lower values ​​are theoretically possible but could cause system instability. As mentioned previously, each video card is different from the others and on one of the eight GPUs we were forced to lower the power by 25%.

After these tweaks, we got results on the pool with a hashrate often higher than 240mhs.


We would like to emphasize that GPU overclocking is the absolute operation that will take you the longest time. It can take hours to reach the so-called "sweet spot" of each video card. Our OverdriveNTool guide will surely help you!

But this achievement will give you great satisfaction, we guarantee it.
Below the stable settings for the RX Vega 64 video cards of our 13 GPU Mining Rig of which you can see some videos on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdE9TTHAOtyKxy59rALSprA

Complete Guide to OverdriveNTool
See you soon for the next guide dedicated to mining!

If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

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By: cryptoall.it Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75 Netbox Browser: https://netbox.global/PZn5A
submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

16" Apple MBP CPU burning up - PS4, Elgato, Twitch

Hey folks,
Thank you for taking a second to look. I'll be as detailed as possible. Log file provided of last test stream to Twitch.
In my attempts to stream to Twitch via OBS, my CPU cranks to around 80%, sometimes 90% (via Stream Deck CPU monitor) - OBS always reads about half of that. For instance, Stream Deck XL says CPU is 70%, then OBS says 35%. This all happens within the first 3 minutes of starting a test stream. Additionally, latency w/ the webcam gets crazy out of hand. The whole overall stream turns to garbage within minutes. I am having a hard time digesting that this computer cannot process this stream, especially since I have a decent capture card. I have a fair understanding of GPU / CPU and such but this doesn't makes sense. This computer slays any minimum requirement requested by OBS, Elgato, Twitch, etc. I have tried too many configs to count, and they're all treating my comp like I'm mining mother bitcoin. lol.
Here's what I'm working with:

Here are my current settings:
Output:
Advanced
1 studio track
x2^4
Ticked enforce streaming
Un-ticked rescale
CBR
4000kbps
Un-ticked
Keyframe interval 2
Ultrafast
None
None


Audio:
48k Stereo

Video:
Canvas - 1920x1080
Scales - 1920x1080
Bicubic - Sharp
Common FPS 60
submitted by EzroHaze to obs [link] [comments]

($100 USD Bounty) 1950x with a Vega 64 Crashing Often with Solid Screens [Repost]

***This problem is getting in the way of my work too often. If it's allowed, I'm willing to post a $100 USD bounty (zelle, venmo, paypal, bitcoin, gift cards) to anyone that's able to either fix the issue or single out the computer part that's causing this. Willing to escrow the hundred bucks to a trusted member or a mod. I apologize if something like this isn't allowed; feel free to take it down if it isn't.***
Description of Original Problem: This is what I mean by solid screens: https://imgur.com/a/VhtB1oT
Those are pictures of my 3 monitors after a crash. It's not necessarily always a black screen when crashing or even a white one at that. It'll often be some sort of green, orange, etc.
I'm honestly lost at what could be causing this. It's been happening ever since I built this computer 2-3 years ago but only once a week at most. Now with the recent task of having to record videos on OBS, it crashes every 15-30 minutes. Before using OBS it was getting bad where it was crashing once every day or two. Any general help or troubleshooting help would be greatly appreciated. I've already updated BIOS, chipset, and video card drivers to latest.
-No manual overclocks of CPU and GPU. Everything just standard right out of the box.
Computer Type: Desktop, custom built 2-3 years ago.
GPU: I have the MSI Gaming Radeon Vega 64. Bought from this link from newegg's ebay account: https://www.ebay.com/p/2206488186?iid=382237989343
CPU: Threadripper 1950x
Motherboard: Asrock Taichi x399 this one: https://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/X399%20Taichi/index.asp
RAM: https://www.newegg.com/g-skill-16gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820232530?Description=flare%20x&cm_re=flare_x-_-20-232-530-_-Product&quicklink=true
8 sticks of this. It was 4 sticks, set at XMP speeds, 3200mhz, but after adding 4 more, it wouldn't boot at xmp speeds so I have them at 2400 mhz currently with the same XMP timings, however. I'm not sure if this is related to the frequency of crashes but it's crashed often before I added more RAM.
PSU: EVGA G3 1000W Platinum
Case: Fractal Meshify C, using Noctua cooler (NH-US14S TR4-SP3)
Operating System & Version: Windows 10
GPU Drivers: Latest driver automatically installed by "Radeon Software". Driver Version: 20.4.2
Chipset Drivers: AMD Chipset Drivers Revision Number: 2.04.04.111, / Release Date 4/7/2020
Background Applications: Discord, Skype, Google Chrome, other various basic software. I recently started recording lots of videos using OBS where it'll cause the same crash but very frequently (up to every 15 minutes). The crashes were somewhat bearable before but now with having to record videos, it's just gotten absolutely annoying.
Troubleshooting: I'm looking for a way to troubleshoot as I don't know any other ways. I logged HWINFO sensors before a crash and all the clock speeds, voltages, and temps seem normal. Here is a log a minute before the crash. Before, it was near impossible to recreate the crash reliably but now with recording OBS, I can make it crash somewhat reliably.
Here is the log (csv file) for anyone interested: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1NqAjdhohWDRAQOR4166xOslPyyj0MaVa/view?usp=sharing
Here's another log of a crash that happened just now with OBS. I can recreate the crash using OBS somewhat reliably.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1I5hb1gPh3-QjaVDrzuXL2TbWVTs1tipU/view?usp=sharing
Additional Info: I'm not sure if this information is valuable but the same crashes have happened in 3 completely different cities that I've lived in in the past 2-3 years. Also tried ddu-ing my current amd gpu drivers and installing 19.9.2. No luck there either.
I have 3 monitors, middle big one is a 4k 60hz monitor, right one is a 1080p gaming 24 inch monitor 144hz but will crash even set at 60hz. Left one is an ultra wide 1080p 25 inch LG monitor, had overclocked to 75hz but will crash regardless of refresh rate again.

Edit: More info the better so - Boot up drive is a Samsung 960 EVO 500GB SSD. Also have a 1TB Intel m.2 SSD, along with 2 external WD hard drives, 4TB and 8TB. Never touched the SSDs but have tried disconnecting the external hard drives and crashes still appear.
submitted by UpDoggg to AMDHelp [link] [comments]

[USA-CA] [H] Cheap Intel i3 4330 Bundle (2x CPUs, Board, 10gb RAM, GPU) [W] Verified PayPal

EDIT: Sold for $65 to fwipsy without the HD4870 Video Card
I'm trying to clear out all of my remaining DDR3/1150 parts in one bundle and have priced it accordingly.
Everything except the i3 CPU and the video card in this bundle, came from a storage locker auction that appears to have been from a low-end bitcoin mining rig. The i3 CPU was previously running in my TS140 before I upgraded it and the HD4870 was just laying around looking for a new home. Everything works like it should and has been tested together. Just add your case, power supply and drive.
Note: The Pentium G3320 doesn't support 1600MHz RAM, so if you want to use that CPU with the included parts, you'll need to use the Crucial or PNY RAM.
TIMESTAMPS

CATEGORY DESCRIPTION CONDITION
Motherboard AsRock H81 Pro BTC Used / Working / Box Included
CPU Intel Core i3 4330 3.5GHz Dual Core (54w TDP) Used / Working / Installed
CPU Intel Pentium G3320 3.0GHz Dual Core Used / Working
Cooler Stock Intel Cooler Used / Working
RAM Crucial DDR3 1333MHz 4GB Kit (2x2gb) Used / Working
RAM G.Skill DDR3 1600MHz 2GB Kit (2x1gb) Used / Working / In Packaging
RAM PNY 4GB DDR3 1333MHz (1 Stick) Used / Working
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD4870 512mb Video Card Used / Working
Price: $80 Delivered via Verified Paypal [Sold for $65 to fwipsy without the HD4870 Video Card] (includes USPS Priority shipping within the lower 48 states)
Location: 92399
If interested, please leave a comment and PM me.
submitted by flyboy34 to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

Advice on GPU upgrade for linking with Oculus Quest

Greetings knowledgeable and generous folks. Three years ago, you helped me with a build - thank you - which needs an update to the GPU. That was the time of the bitcoin mining explosion and video card prices went crazy. Here is the build I ended up with:
I'm thinking of replacing the GPU with something like a Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080/2070 so I can link my Oculus Quest (the AMD chips seem to be buggy with Oculus), and improve the viewing experience on my monitor. I play World of Tanks almost exclusively, but may head into Red Dead, or racing sims. I also watch Netflix on the PC.
My questions: 1. I think it's OK to mix the Nvidia with the AMD CPU. Correct? 2. Would the CPU need an upgrade because of the jump in GPU? 3. Would DRAM need an upgrade? 4. Any advice either on the GPU, or video board manufacturer? I've been working from Tom's list of GPUs.
Thanks in advance for lending your expertise.
submitted by hippo_canoe to buildapc [link] [comments]

Building my first rig with 6 GPUs using an Asus B250 MB, looking for advice

New member so please be gentle. I have been micro mining for a few months now (with my GTX 1060 and my new RTX 2080 ti) and want to step up my game a notch. I have my sites set on building the following system with the specs listed below so far. Any input on why I should not use a specific item or why I should use a certain item would be greatly appreciated!
1. Kingwin Bitcoin Miner Rig Case W/ 6, or 8 GPU Mining Stackable Frame x 1:
I have expansion in mind with this frame. It's stackable and ounces I ROI my first rig I plan on tossing a second level on to it. This frame is currently selling for around $50.
Kingwin Bitcoin Miner Rig Case W/ 6, or 8 GPU Mining Stackable Frame
2. ROSEWILL Gaming 80 Plus Gold 1600W Power Supply (HERCULES-1600S) x 1:
The heart of any rig, the power! I like this one for it's 1600W and it's price. Currently running around $200.
ROSEWILL Gaming 80 Plus Gold 1600W Power Supply (HERCULES-1600S)
3. ASUS B250 MINING EXPERT Motherboard x 1:
This motherboard is being used with expansion in mind. I want to start with 6 GPUs then build on that. Currently running around $140.
ASUS MINING EXPERT Motherboard (B250)
4. VOLADOR PCI-E Riser 1x to 16x Powered Riser Adapter Card (USB3) x 6:
Standard USB 3.0 risers. They come in a six-pack for about $20.
VOLADOR PCI-E Riser 1x to 16x Powered Riser Adapter Card (USB3)
5. XFX Radeon RX 580 GTS XXX Edition (RX-580P8DFD6) x 6:
Currently cheaper than the Sapphire below. These are currently running around $170.
XFX Radeon RX 580 GTS XXX Edition (RX-580P8DFD6)

5-ALT. Sapphire Radeon Pulse RX 580 8GB (11265-05-20G) - BACKUP CHOICE GPU:
This is what I was looking at first then I found the cheaper XFX Radeon's above. These are currently running around $180.
Sapphire Radeon Pulse RX 580 8GB (11265-05-20G)

6. CPU:
Currently I do not have any CPUs in mind to use for this rig. I know I don't need a beefy CPU for running Windows. I plan on ONLY mining with GPUs in this rig. Suggestions are welcome!

7. Memory:
Currently I do not have any memory in my sites. Suggestions are welcome!

8. Harddrive:
I plan on using a simple 128GB USB thumb drive for the hard drive right now. Possibly something like an SSD if needed, but plan on using USB flash drive to start. Pros/Cons suggestions welcome!

I think I my video my endeavor and show everyone how fun/frustrating it all was. Catching all the pitfalls in hopes of helping others out etc. But first I need to have a plan and that's what this is. I need to do some lite research, get a good shopping list, make a payment plan, and an ROI schedule. Any feedback that the community could give me would be very helpful because I only know about 80% of what I need to know to build this rig. The 20% is the overclocking, bios issues (MB and gpu), and general knowledge of building a mining rig. I expect there to be pitfalls and parts I didn't think of until I start the build.
submitted by armega to cryptomining [link] [comments]

Some last minute budget build advice

Im building a pc for my tech illiterate friend within the next 2 weeks who mainly plays competitive online games. The budget is £1000, but the 144hz monitor is £150, so only £850 is left for the build. I've been out of the scene for 2 years, so my current knowledge is a bit rusty, but here is what I came up with: PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £157.05 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard Asus TUF B450M-PLUS GAMING Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard £83.99 @ Amazon UK
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory £69.12 @ Amazon UK
Storage Crucial MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive £59.45 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB TUF Gaming X3 OC Video Card £364.44 @ Amazon UK
Case CiT F3 MicroATX Mini Tower Case £31.99 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply Corsair CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply £74.98 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC Arctic F12 74 CFM 120 mm Fan £4.49 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £845.51
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-13 16:09 BST+0100
The case I plan to buy doesn't happen to be on pcpartpicker, but it costs £29 and has everything we need. I'm mainly cautious on the power supply and motherboard choice though, and I'm worried about any component price changes that might occur within the next 2 weeks. I built my computer shortly after the bitcoin phase, so graphics cards drastically changed in price every other week, so I'm not sure about the current state of component prices nowadays, especially amidst coronavirus.
submitted by deadication1221 to buildapc [link] [comments]

Updated 2018 How to mine Bitcoin with GPU Video Card ... 1.2GHash/s GPU Bitcoin and Litecoin Mining Rig PPCoin-Mining with single Radeon HD 5970 @ ~800 Mh/s Bitcoin Mining Rack 18 Video Cards 5.1gh Radeon HD 4870x2 litecoin mining

The current hashrate of video cards for 2020 Details Created: Monday, 27 April 2020 03:50 In 2020, as before, new cryptocurrencies with "revolutionary" mining algorithms for the GPU continue to enter the market, but like in previous years, the leader remains the Ethereum cryptocurrency mining algorithm - Dagger Hashimoto or simply ETHash. SAPPHIRE Radeon R9 270X Vapor-X; SAPPHIRE Radeon R7 260X; This gave us quite the spread in terms of AMD's latest GPUs, so we can get a nice test against all of the cards on the market. The cards ... I have been studying the hardware chart we shared in other threads and put together a small list of great "bang for your buck" cards for Great AMD/ATI Graphics Cards for bitcoin/litecoin mining Video Cards Finding one of these cards in new condition for under US$500 is nearly impossible, though. 2. AMD Radeon RX 580. Most miners-at-home prefer to buy the latest generation of AMD video cards, for obvious reasons. The cards are cheaper to buy, easy to set up and pack quite a bit of performance. The Radeon RX 580 can mine at a top speed of 29 MH/s ... Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition Beta for Blockchain Compute Highlights Important Notes This driver is provided as a beta level support driver which should be considered "as is" and will not be supported with further updates, upgrades or bug fixes. This driver is not intended for graphics or gaming workloads. 64 Bit drivers for Windows 10 & Windows 7 updated to include support for Radeon ...

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Updated 2018 How to mine Bitcoin with GPU Video Card ...

11 x Radeon 5770's 4 x Radeon 6970's 1 x Radeon 5970 ( Dual GPU ) ... 20 GRAPHICS CARD BITCOIN MINING RIG ATI 5870 8MH/GH - Duration: 0:49. TheKoolio 62,179 views. 0:49. LiteCoin: How to earn ... ATI Radeon HD 4850 Bitcoin Mining - Duration: 1:19. John Cuppi 9,228 views. 1:19 ... HIS HD 4870 X2 2GB GDDR5 Video Card Video Review - Duration: 6:54. 3DGAMEMAN 136,942 views. 6:54. CPU Coin ... If you want to exchange your bitcoins for other crypto: (Ethereum, XRB, Litecoin) this is a handy exchange: https://www.kucoin.com/#/?r=256xv I have a video ... Ati Radeon 4x5850 Litecoin (Bitcoin) Mining Rig - Duration: 2 ... Radeon HD 5870 1GB ATI Video Card XFX Unboxing Linus Tech Tips - Duration: 3:44. Linus Tech Tips 168,993 views. 3:44 . How to Mine ... This is my 1.2GH/s GPU based mining rig for both SHA-256 and Scrypt based mining. I have installed 4 x 5830 Radeon Sapphire Video Cards by PCI-e 16x connection, for approximately 1200Mh/s total.

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