C++ RSA Encrypt Hash using SHA256 hash function and SHA1 ...

Introduction to Bitterfly: Butterfly Matrix Entropy Weight Consensus Algorithm

When Bitcoin launched 11 years ago, Satoshi Nakamoto had the vision of giving people power over their money. His vision lives on through BTC. However, the Bitcoin network has a few flaws. One of those flaws is the Proof of Work mechanism. Mining Bitcoin requires a huge amount of resources that are out of reach for most ordinary people. The result is that the BTC network is increasingly being placed in centralized control.The Bitterfly project hopes to change that using a revolutionary consensus mechanism called the Buttery that will be used on the Bitterfly blockchain.
About Bitterfly
Bitterfly wants to continue the vision that Nakamoto had for Bitcoin. The goal is to give power back to the people and place them in control of their finances. To do this, the Bitterfly team is working on three main areas that require improvement:
· The consensus mechanism
· The blockchain performance
· Community Governance
The Consensus Mechanism
To improve the consensus mechanism, the team behind Bitterfly has created the Butterfly algorithm that they will add to the PoW mechanism. Not only can it ensures that the hash rate is obtained fairly, it ensures that the hash rate of the whole network is enhanced via the butterfly effect.
Performance
In terms of performance, the Bitterfly blockchain has been upgraded to have a confirmed commercial speed of 5000TPS. Bitterfly is designed as a Blockchain As a Service open-source platform, which can be used in different applications.
Bitterfly will support different types of computing services that include cloud servers. As a result, it will utilize idle server resources to boost the hash rate support for the network.
Community Governance
When it comes to community Governance, Bitterfly plans to introduce a node competition mechanism that will release 210 nodes over time to enhance the butterfly effect. First, they will introduce the nodes via the Butterfly matrix network. Later, they will do so via a fair elimination process. The goal is to ensure that the nodes contribute to the success of Bitterfly.
The Encryption Algorithm
Encryption and decryption of data are at the core of the operation of any blockchain. It helps to guarantee the security of the whole blockchain. Only a corresponding private key can unlock data encrypted using a public key.
In most blockchains, the Hash Function and the Asymmetric Key Encryption Algorithm are used to encrypt and decrypt data. For the Hush Function, the main algorithms used are SHA and MD5.Bitterfly uses the SHA256 algorithm for encryption and RSA, DSA, and Elliptic curve algorithms for decryption. For the verification phase, Bitterfly developed the DFLYSChnorr, which is based on the SCHNOOR algorithm.
Consensus Algorithm
The consensus mechanism is used in the blockchain to ensure that each transaction is accurate. Bitterfly plans to operate within the enterprise space, which requires comprehensive and heterogeneous systems that are integrated with various communication protocols.
To deal with the challenges that might arise, Bitterfly developed a two-layer consensus algorithm for the PoW mechanism called the PBFT algorithm. Here is how the Bitterfly algorithm works:
· The network Structure
Bitterfly is designed as an internet payment and application protocol that is based on embracing the digital economy. It can facilitate value storage as well as the decentralized exchange of digital assets, payments, as well as clearing functions. Within Bitterfly, everyone can participate in productively. It will place a huge demand on Bitterfly. The network will offer performance guarantees as well as smart contracts.
· Bitterfly Consensus Algorithm
To meet the goal of decentralization and security, Bittefly wants to become a global computer instead of a P2P information system. Besides satisfying the decentralization and security needs of its users via PoW, the system will also need to perform at a high level.
As a result, the team opted to support smart contracts in commercial applications. To deal with the issue of energy consumption, the team came up with the Butterfly algorithm. The algorithm allows the use of PoW as well as other cross-chain methods such as the Layer 2 protocol. Confirmation of transactions is done via verification nodes.
Each node is preconfigured with a list of trusted nodes known as the Consensus Achievement List (CAL). The node list can be used to confirm transactions. Once a transaction is confirmed with the local ledger, it is integrated into the transaction candidate set while all illegal ones are discarded.
To improve the security of the network, the verification confirmation was raised to 60% unlike in other networks where it is 50% +1. A transaction is officially confirmed once it is confirmed by 80% of the CAL nodes. The process is known as the Last Closed Ledger, which represents the latest changes to the ledger.
Within Bitterfly, the identities of those taking part in the confirmation of transactions are known beforehand. AS a result, transactions are faster and the blockchain is more efficient.
Butterfly Matrix Entropy Weight Algorithm
Entropy is used to measure the level of uncertainty in the system. Bitterfly built a way to establish consensus using multiple factors. In the network, each data set has a corresponding weight.
Summary
For the past 11 years, Bitcoin has enjoyed tremendous success. The launch of Bitcoin ushered in a new era for humanity. For the first time in history, decentralized money that is outside the control of governments and other central entities is possible.
The new type of money gives people the power to control their finances and avoid the harsh effects of inflation caused by the wanton printing of government currency. When a new economic downturn hit the global economy, Bitcoin failed the litmus test. While Bitcoin should have helped to save people’s finances as the money printing began, it seemed to have followed the same trend as the sinking global economy.
It revealed that BTC still had numerous weaknesses that need to be corrected. Bitterfly wants to build on what Bitcoin has accomplished and do more with it. The team behind this project is quite optimistic. They believe that they can achieve what Bitcoin has achieved in the past 11 years. Besides that, they believe they can achieve where Bitcoin has failed in those past 11 years.
Social Media Links
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/BitterflyD
MEDIUM: https://medium.com/@BitterflyD
YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxSNCzuQsNj-oCgepxzoXQg
TELEGRAM: https://t.me/Bitterfly_Disciples
submitted by Bitterfly_Disciples to u/Bitterfly_Disciples [link] [comments]

Evidence Points to Bitcoin being an NSA-engineered Psyop to roll out One-World Digital Currency

Eye
I'm going to assume the readers who make it to this article are well informed enough that I don't have to go into the history of the global money changers and their desire for a one world currency.
(If you don't yet understand the goal of the globalist banking empire and the coming engineered collapse of the fiat currency system, you're already about 5,000 posts behind the curve.)
With that as a starting point, it's now becoming increasingly evident that Bitcoin may be a creation of the NSA and was rolled out as a "normalization" experiment to get the public familiar with digital currency.
Once this is established, the world's fiat currencies will be obliterated in an engineered debt collapse (see below for the sequence of events), then replaced with a government approved cryptocurrency with tracking of all transactions and digital wallets by the world's western governments.
NSA mathematicians detailed "digital cash" two decades ago
What evidence supports this notion?
First, take a look at this document entitled, "How to Make a Mint - The Cryptography of Anonymous Electronic Cash." This document, released in 1997 - yes, twenty years ago - detailed the overall structure and function of Bitcoin cryptocurrency.
Who authored the document?
Try not to be shocked when you learn it was authored by,
"mathematical cryptographers at the National Security Agency's Office of Information Security Research and Technology." 
The NSA, in other words, detailed key elements of Bitcoin long before Bitcoin ever came into existence.
Much of the Bitcoin protocol is detailed in this document, including signature authentication techniques, eliminating cryptocoin counterfeits through transaction authentication and several features that support anonymity and untraceability of transactions.
The document even outlines the heightened risk of money laundering that's easily accomplished with cryptocurrencies. It also describes "secure hashing" to be "both one-way and collision-free."
Although Bitcoin adds mining and a shared, peer-to-peer blockchain transaction authentication system to this structure, it's clear that the NSA was researching cryptocurrencies long before everyday users had ever heard of the term.
Note, too, that the name of the person credited with founding Bitcoin is Satoshi Nakamoto, who is reputed to have reserved one million Bitcoins for himself.
Millions of posts and online threads discuss the possible identity of Satishi Nakamoto, and some posts even claim the NSA has identified Satoshi.
However, another likely explanation is that Satoshi Nakamoto is the NSA, which means he is either working for the NSA or is a sock puppet character created by the NSA for the purpose of this whole grand experiment.
The NSA also wrote the crypto hash used by Bitcoin to secure all transactions
On top of the fact that the NSA authored a technical paper on cryptocurrency long before the arrival of Bitcoin, the agency is also the creator of the SHA-256 hash upon which every Bitcoin transaction in the world depends.
As The Hacker News (THN) explains.
"The integrity of Bitcoin depends on a hash function called **SHA-256**, which was designed by the NSA and published by the *National Institute for Standards and Technology* ([NIST](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Institute_of_Standards_and_Technology))." 
THN also adds:
"If you assume that the NSA did something to SHA-256, which no outside researcher has detected, what you get is the ability, with credible and detectable action, they would be able to forge transactions. The really scary thing is somebody finds a way to find collisions in SHA-256 really fast without brute-forcing it or using lots of hardware and then they take control of the network." 
Cryptography researcher Matthew D. Green of Johns Hopkins University said.
In other words, if the SHA-256 hash, which was created by the NSA, actually has a backdoor method for cracking the encryption, it would mean the NSA could steal everybody's Bitcoins whenever it wants (call it "Zero Day.")
That same article, written by Mohit Kumar, mysteriously concludes,
"Even today it's too early to come to conclusions about Bitcoin. Possibly it was designed from day one as a tool to help maintain control of the money supplies of the world." 
And with that statement, Kumar has indeed stumbled upon the bigger goal in all this:
To seize control over the world money supply as the fiat currency system crumbles and is replaced with a one-world *digital currency controlled by globalists*. 
Think cryptography is bulletproof? Think again…
Lest you think that the cryptography of cryptocurrency is secure and bulletproof, consider this article from The Hacker News, 'Researchers Crack 1024-bit RSA Encryption in GnuPG Crypto Library,' which states,
"The attack allows an attacker to extract the secret crypto key from a system by analyzing the pattern of memory utilization or the electromagnetic outputs of the device that are emitted during the decryption process." 
Note, importantly, that this is a 1024-bit encryption system.
The same technique is also said to be able to crack 2048-bit encryption. In fact, encryption layers are cracked on a daily basis by clever hackers.
Some of those encryption layers are powering various cryptocurrencies right now. Unless you are an extremely high-level mathematician, there's no way you can know for sure whether any crypto currency is truly non-hackable.
In fact, every cryptocurrency becomes obsolete with the invention of large-scale quantum computing.
Once China manages to build a working 256-bit quantum computer, it can effectively steal all the Bitcoins in the world (plus steal most national secrets and commit other global mayhem at will).
(Video)
Ten steps to crypto-tyranny - The "big plan" by the globalists (and how it involves Bitcoin)
In summary, here's one possible plan by the globalists to seize total control over the world's money supply, savings, taxation and financial transactions while enslaving humanity.
And it all starts with Bitcoin...
  1.  Roll out the NSA-created Bitcoin to get the public excited about a digital currency. 
  2.  Quietly prepare a globalist-controlled cryptocurrency to take its place. (JP Morgan, anyone...?) 
  3.  Initiate a massive, global-scale [false flag operation](http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_falseflag.htm) that crashes the global debt markets and sends fiat currencies down in flames (hoax alien invasion, hoax North Korean EMP attack, mass distributed power grid terrorism network, etc.) 
  4.  Blame whatever convenient enemy is politically acceptable (North Korea, "the Russians," Little Green Men or whatever it takes…) 
  5.  Allow the fiat currency debt pyramid to collapse and smolder until the sheeple get desperate. 
  6.  With great fanfare, announce a government-backed cryptocurrency replacement for all fiat currencies, and position world governments as the SAVIOR of humanity. Allow the desperate public to trade in their fiat currencies for official crypto currencies. 
  7.  [Outlaw cash](http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_globalbanking.htm#Cashless_Society) and *criminalize gold and silver ownership by private citizens*. All in the name of "security," of course. 
  8.  Criminalize all non-official cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, crashing their value virtually overnight and funneling everyone into the one world government crypto, where the NSA controls the blockchain. This can easily be achieved by blaming the false flag event (see above) on some nation or group that is said to have been "funded by Bitcoin, the cryptocurrency used by terrorists." 
  9.  Require [embedded RFID](http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/secret_projects/implants.htm#RFID) or biometric identifiers for all transactions in order to "authenticate" the one-world digital crypto currency activities. *Mark of the Beast* becomes reality. No one is allowed to eat, travel or earn a wage without being marked. 
  10.  Once absolute control over the new one-world digital currency is achieved, weaponize the government-tracked blockchain to track all transactions, investments and commercial activities. Confiscate a portion of all crypto under the guise of "automated taxation." In an emergency, the government can even announce *negative interest rates* where your holdings automatically decrease each day. 
With all this accomplished, globalists can now roll out absolute totalitarian control over every aspect of private lives by enforcing financial "blackouts" for those individuals who criticize the government.
They can put in place automatic deductions for traffic violations, vehicle license plate taxes, internet taxes and a thousand other oppressive taxes invented by the bureaucracy.
With automatic deductions run by the government, citizens have no means to halt the endless confiscation of their "money" by totalitarian bureaucrats and their deep state lackeys.
How do you feel about your Bitcoin now...?
Video
by Mike Adams December 10, 2017 from NaturalNews Website
Source
submitted by Metaliano to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Google’s Quantum Computing Breakthrough Brings Blockchain Resistance Into the Spotlight Again

Google’s Quantum Computing Breakthrough Brings Blockchain Resistance Into the Spotlight Again


News by Forbes: Darryn Pollock
Quantum computing has been on the tech radar for some time now, but it has also been lurking in the background of the blockchain ecosystem for very different reasons. The new advancement of computing allows for complex equations and problems to be solved exponentially quicker than is currently available.
However, it has always been predominantly a futuristic, almost science fiction-like pursuit; for blockchain that has been just fine as well because we have been warned that quantum computation could render existing encryption standards obsolete, threatening the security of every significant blockchain.
This week, news has emerged that Google has made a recent quantum computing breakthrough, achieving quantum supremacy. It is being reported that Google, using a quantum computer, managed to perform a calculation in just over three minutes that would take the world’s most powerful supercomputer 10,000 years.
This could mean panic stations for blockchain as all that has been achieved thus far could be wiped out, and without the right provisions, all the promise and potential could be eliminated overnight.
However, the term quantum supremacy refers to the moment when a quantum computer outperforms the world’s best classical computer in a specific test. This is just the first step, but it is a rather large step that means the spotlight is once again on blockchain to try and resist this kind of technology which can unravel its cryptographic algorithms in minutes.
Google’s first steps
Google has described the recent achievement as a “milestone towards full-scale quantum computing.” They have also said this milestone puts a marker in the ground on which they can start rapidly progressing towards full quantum computing — another concerning statement form blockchains.
Details are a little scarce on what Google has achieved, and how they have done it, but previous proposals essentially involve the quantum computer racing a classical computer simulating a random quantum circuit.
According to Gizmodo, it has been long known that Google has been testing a 72-qubit device called Bristlecone with which it hoped to achieve quantum supremacy and the initial report from the Financial Times says that the supremacy experiment was instead performed with a 53-qubit processor codenamed Sycamore.
However, it would be a little early to start abandoning all hope with Bitcoin, blockchain, and the emerging technology as it is a bit more complicated than that. More so, there is already technology and projects in place that has been trying to prepare for an age of quantum computing where blockchain is resistant.
Are blockchains ready to resist?
So, if quantum computing is making significant breakthroughs, is there any evidence of blockchain’s being prepared for this new age, and a new threat? There has been news of blockchain builders putting out quantum-resistant chains, such as E-cash inventor David Chaum and his latest cryptocurrency, Praxxis.

David Chaum, Elixxir on Moneyconf Stage during day two of Web Summit 2018 (Photo by Eoin Noonan /Web Summit via Getty Images)

WEB SUMMIT VIA GETTY IMAGES
QAN is another project that says it is ready for the quantum computing age, has reacted quickly to the news of Google’s breakthrough with Johann Polecsak, CTO of QAN, telling Bitcoin.com: “The notion of Google achieving a quantum breakthrough sounds very dramatic, but in reality, it’s hard to gauge the significance at this time. How can we be sure that Google’s quantum computer is more powerful than D-wave’s, for example, which surpassed 1,000 qubits four years ago?”
I also reached out to Polecsak to find out more about the threat of quantum computing when, and if, it reaches its pinnacle.
“We should definitely be worried,” he told me, “Many IT professionals and CTOs, including the earlier m, are neglecting and denying quantum computing threats with the simple reasoning that once it’s seriously coming, we’ll have to redesign almost everything from scratch, and that must surely be a long time ahead.”
“The truth is that one can already rent quantum computers for experimenting with possible attack algorithms and testing theoretical approaches. The maths behind breaking currently used public key cryptography — EC and RSA — were proven, we just need more qubits.”
“In cryptography, it’s best to prepare for the worst, and one can observe in recent literature that past skeptics now instantiate their crypto protocols in a post-quantum setting — just it case. Users shouldn’t worry now, but experts should prepare before it’s too late.”
QAN CTO Johann Polecsak speaking about the threat of quantum computing at a conference in Seoul, South Korea.

SUPPLIED
What it means to be quantum-resistant
Of course, the technological aspect of the race between quantum computing and blockchain quantum resistance is immense, and it is also quite nuanced. It is not as if quantum computing will, like a light switch, be available and all blockchains will suddenly be vulnerable — but it is still important to be prepared. As it stands, there probably is not enough preparation and planning in place, according to Polecsak.
“Blockchains won’t be ready for such a breakthrough. Since transaction history is the backbone of blockchains, such an improvement in quantum computing could be catastrophic for the whole transaction history,” added the CTO. “There is an extra layer of protection with Bitcoin’s double hashing but assuming a quantum computer is capable of Shor on secp256k1 it’s safe to assume it’s also capable of Grover256. Also, we don’t know bounds for SHA regarding quantum circuits.”
“As for QAN blockchain platform, it is not a linear comparison or a race where we need to keep up side-by-side with increasing qubits. Being Quantum-safe does not mean that we are just increasing bits in currently used algorithms, but that we take a totally different approach which resists the known Quantum attacks by design.”
Prepare to resist
As science-fictiony as it sounds, quantum computing is a threat that needs to be taken seriously in the world of blockchains. It may not be the kill switch that everyone imagines because of media hype, but it certainly something that should be on the radar for anyone involved in the ecosystem.
It is not only because of what has been accomplished in blockchain thus far but also because of what is being built and promised in the space. Blockchain is a major technology revolution on the horizon, and as it permeates deeper into enterprises and governments it would be catastrophic for all that has been done to be undone, and all that has been promised to be eliminated.
submitted by GTE_IO to u/GTE_IO [link] [comments]

Why the NSA revelations make me worried about the safety of Bitcoin

This has probably been discussed before, but I don't see how Bitcoin can be a safe method of storing wealth, given our current situation where the NSA observes EVERYTHING. Not just that, the NSA has installed backdoors in nearly all of our hardware. Both Intel and AMD processors likely have hardware backdoors for the NSA.
Back in 2010, the NSA broke a variety of cryptographic standards. In addition, we know that the NSA has lobbied organizations to implement weak cryptographic standards. Furthermore, we know that the NSA has pushed for flawed random number generators. Weak random number generators have previously led to the theft of large numbers of Bitcoin on mobile devices.
Bitcoin completely relies on the integrity of the SHA-256 algorithm, which was developed by the SAME NSA that intentionally pushes flawed cryptographic standards. Bruce Schneier no longer trusts the NSA's elliptic curve cryptography standard, as he believes they may have intentionally chosen a weak elliptic curve that the NSA can use. The numbers used are supposed to be random to make it unlikely that anyone could exploit a weak curve, but the NSA provided different numbers, that are non-random.
Vitalik Buterin argues that we can expect Bitcoin not to use a weak curve, as the numbers used in Bitcoin are fairly simple to calculate, whereas arbitrary numbers would create the possibility of Satoshi using an intentionally weak curve.
However, it seems to me that we can argue the exact opposite as well. For p, Bitcoin uses 115792089237316195423570985008687907853269984665640564039457584007908834671663, which is arrived at by calculating 2256 – 232 – 977 and seems fairly arbitrary to me as well.
Perhaps the main cause of my worries is the fact that the NSA in 1996 created a document outlining how to make a digital currency based on cryptography. Thus we know that the NSA has been studying the possibility of cryptocurrencies for a long period. Considering how the NSA manages to keep control over cryptography by releasing weak standards itself, is it possible that the NSA attempts to do the same with cryptocurrency?
Finally, I'm very worried about who this anonymous hacker who calls himself Satoshi Nakamoto might be. The Bitcoin source code contained different incomplete ideas that were never implemented, such as a decentralized marketplace (this is from memory, can't find the link). It all seems very ambitious to be the product of a single individual.
What is most worrying about Satoshi Nakamoto however is what is found in the blockchain. There's a non-random distribution of nonces in the early blockchain. What this means is that Satoshi Nakamoto was mining Bitcoin with a mining rig that was completely different from what everyone else was using back then.
It seems that he used 58 different computers, all with a different ID and all programmed to use different nonces to avoid checking the same possible solution multiple times, and at some point some of the computers broke down and were not put back up. This is not a genius amateur, but rather, someone with access to a lot of equipment. What makes all of this worse, is the fact that most of these blocks appear never to have moved. In other words, whatever entity mined these blocks probably still has control over them and doesn't seem to be motivated by personal gain. Rather, their control over about 1 million Bitcoin seems to have created a kind of "deathswitch", that allows them to crash the market at will.
Finally, Nakamoto's behavior is strange. As noted by others, his timezone seems to indicate he lived on the West Coast, yet his language uses British spelling. Furthermore, he took up to two weeks to respond to comments, indicating that anything he said seemed to require approval from higher ups, or agreement among multiple persons.
In conclusion, there is nothing here that indicates to me that we are dealing with a project designed by a regular Joe. Instead, we seem to be sitting on a ticking time bomb, a ten billion dollar experiment that could be deflated at will and cause economic chaos in the process.
submitted by accountt1234 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

DDoS thread received: Meridian Collective (Probably a SCAM)

We received today an email demanding 1 BTC to avoid being attacked by a DDoS on Friday 16th this month ( june ). We are a small company based in Spain. Possibly a scam as the bitcoin address they gave in the e-mail has been sent to others ( found through google ).
spanish police notified and responsible listed in whois for emblixhosting.com also notified with an e-mail.
We have also notified our ISP just in case.
Any suggestion on how to proceed further ?
Just for reference, hereafter is the text of the e-mail and the headers.
------ Threat e-mail text -----
PLEASE FORWARD THIS EMAIL TO SOMEONE IN YOUR COMPANY WHO IS ALLOWED TO MAKE IMPORTANT DECISIONS!
We are the Meridian Collective and we have chosen your website/network as target for our next DDoS attack.
1 - We checked your security system. The system works is very bad
2 - On Friday 16_06_2017_8:00p.m. GMT !!! We begin to attack your network servers and computers
3 - We will produce a powerful DDoS attack - up to 300 Gbps
4 - Your servers will be hacking the database is damaged
5 - All data will be encrypted on computers Crypto-Ransomware
4 - You can stop the attack beginning, if payment 1 bitcoin to bitcoin ADDRESS: 1HgGf2BCRkBmJNy13oWPo267bq7Lp17Djr
5 - Do you have time to pay. If you do not pay before the attack 1 bitcoin the price will increase to 5 bitcoins
6 - After payment we will advice how to fix bugs in your system
Please send the bitcoin to the following Bitcoin address:
1HgGf2BCRkBmJNy13oWPo267bq7Lp17Djr
Once you have paid we will automatically get informed that it was your payment.
How do I get Bitcoins?
You can easily buy bitcoins via several websites or even offline from a Bitcoin-ATM. We suggest you to start with localbitcoins.com or do a google search.
What if I don’t pay? If you decide not to pay, we will start the attack at the indicated date and uphold it until you do, there’s no counter measure to this, you will only end up wasting more money trying to find a solution. We will completely destroy your reputation amongst google and your customers and make sure your website will remain offline until you pay. This is not a hoax, do not reply to this email, don’t try to reason or negotiate, we will not read any replies. Once you have paid we won’t start the attack and you will never hear from us again! Please note that Bitcoin is anonymous and no one will find out that you have complied.
-------- Headers follow minus internal network details marked [Redacted]----------
 Return-Path:  X-Original-To: [Redacted] Delivered-To:[Redacted] Received: from [Redacted] by [redacted] (Postfix) with ESMTP id 36DD018201A8 for [redacted]; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:23:22 +0200 (CEST) Delivered-To: [Redacted] Received: from gmail-pop.l.google.com [74.125.206.109] by [Redacted] with POP3 (fetchmail-6.3.26) for [Redacted] (single-drop); Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:23:22 +0200 (CEST) Received: by 10.237.41.2 with SMTP id s2csp452310qtd; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 08:21:30 -0700 (PDT) X-Received: by 10.237.46.34 with SMTP id j31mr507952qtd.149.1497367289757; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 08:21:29 -0700 (PDT) Authentication-Results: mx.google.com; spf=softfail (google.com: domain of transitioning [email protected] does not designate 130.117.93.39 as permitted sender) [email protected] Received-SPF: softfail (google.com: domain of transitioning [email protected] does not designate 130.117.93.39 as permitted sender) client-ip=130.117.93.39; Received: by 10.237.59.216 with POP3 id s24mf109799569qte.1; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 08:21:29 -0700 (PDT) X-Gmail-Fetch-Info: [Redacted] Received: from [Redacted] by [Redacted] with ESMTP id v5DFHcfD026875 (version=TLSv1/SSLv3 cipher=DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA bits=256 verify=NO) for [Redacted]; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:17:40 +0200 Received: from emb.emblixhosting.com (emb.emblixhosting.com [162.144.44.60]) by [Redacted] (8.13.8/8.12.10/SuSE Linux 0.7) with ESMTP id v5DFHT13011421 for [Redacted]; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:17:41 +0200 Received: from [179.99.83.164] (port=49316 helo=163.172.169.211) by emb.emblixhosting.com with esmtpa (Exim 4.89) (envelope-from ) id 1dKnZK-0002Ux-MJ for [Redacted]; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 20:47:23 +0530 Message-ID: <[email protected]> From: "Meridian.collective"  To: [Redacted] Subject: Meridian Collective Date: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 08:15:12 -0700 MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="410ade9008201f22ff91d19f316b" X-Priority: 1 X-AntiAbuse: This header was added to track abuse, please include it with any abuse report X-AntiAbuse: Primary Hostname - emb.emblixhosting.com X-AntiAbuse: Original Domain - [Redacted] X-AntiAbuse: OriginatoCaller UID/GID - [47 12] / [47 12] X-AntiAbuse: Sender Address Domain - mebtel.net X-Get-Message-Sender-Via: emb.emblixhosting.com: authenticated_id: [email protected] X-Authenticated-Sender: emb.emblixhosting.com: [email protected] X-Source: X-Source-Args: X-Source-Dir: 
Edit: format of headers Edit : Thread -> Threat ; cannot change post title, though
submitted by Azucarillo to sysadmin [link] [comments]

General info and list of exchanges for Paymon (PMNT)

What is Paymon? Conversion and withdrawal of cryptocurrencies in only 2 clicks. Advanced encryption system. Ability to communicate with others. Unique game platform. Who is Paymon for? For those who want to transfer money to friends and relatives anywhere in the world. For those are fed up with the current banking system. For those do not want to pay fees to the intermediary parties. What is Bitcoin? Decentralised currency (a currency which is not managed by any single bank, company or state, allowing complete anonymity of users' transactions). Anonymous system (data is encrypted with the help of blockchain). A currency that is not limited by just one country, it can be used anywhere in the world. How is Paymon different from other payment systems? Paymon is operating on a blockchain system, it works only with cryptocurrencies. You can convert cryptocurrencies to fiat. You can exchange cryptocurrencies with people from all over the world. Anyone can use Paymon platform. Paymon is a user-friendly platform. Are there any commissions? In each transaction you are the one to set the commission. The higher it is, the faster is the transaction. This feature is available only for Bitcoin transfers.
Bitcoin: - The recommended minimum commission for Bitcoins transfers is 0.0005 BTC.
Ethereum: - The Commission depends on the network load and is not usually more than 525000 Gwei (~0.18$)
How to conduct a transaction? Paymon creates a Bitcoin wallet attached to your personal account automatically, once you register in the system. You can also create an Ethereum wallet or restore it from the backup copy. These wallets are in the Blockchain system and only you have access to them. The added fiat funds are automatically converted to cryptocurrency. In order to conduct a transaction, you need to go to the “Money” tab in our application, then enter a wallet’s address. Or you can simply find the user in your contacts list and press “Transfer” in the dialog window. Addition and Withdrawal. Important!
Please do not add or withdraw funds in any ways other those that are in Paymon. Conducting such operations through intermediaries might cause you substantial losses. In order to add funds, you need to go to the “Money” tab in our application and click “Add”. Thus to withdraw click “Withdraw”. Commission is individual for each transaction. Who will have access to my personal information and wallets? Only you Can I add already existing cryptowallets? You cannot have two of the same cryptocurrency wallets, but you can add other wallets. - JSON format for Ethereum.
How to make a wallet cold? What is a cold wallet? This feature is not available for Bitcoin wallets. You can make a backup copy of the Ethereum wallet and then “delete” it. Thus making it cold. With the help of a cold wallet you will be able to keep cryptocurrency on physical carriers. They don’t have access to the Internet, which means that hackers won’t be able to reach it.
What makes the correspondence secure? We use our own Protocol in the application. All traffic is encrypted with Diffie-Hellman and AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) using SHA (Secure Hash Algorithm). All correspondence is encrypted with RSA-2048.
Kucoin
Binance
Bit-Z
Bibox
Linkcoin
Qryptos
submitted by cryptoinvestor2020 to PaymonPMNT [link] [comments]

I posted this on the other sub and it wasn't well received....

"I love learning about this thing and I think Bitcoin / the cryptocurrency is the future. It's the next big thing along with Artificial Intelligence and the quantum computer. Just like the invention of the personal computer was big, just like the invention of the internet was big, I think Bitcoin / the decentralized cryptocurrency is the next thing.
I'm still a beginner but I thought I'd contribute as much as I know so that others would not waste time like I did, while the price is rising at a tremendous rate.
And, all those softwares like Breadwallet, Airbitz, bitaddress.org - how do we know that they're not giving us already known Key Pairs?
Sure, programmers can audit the code on Github and compile it, but for non-programmers, there's no way to know.
I see lots of people "buying" their bitcoin on Coinbase or other exchanges and think that's it. If the bitcoin is not in your address and you don't own the Private Key, you don't own the bitcoin..
So, the following may seem paranoid but, these are the steps that I found (for the experienced bitcoiners, please just scan through it. You'd probably know all these already):
Using Bitcoin Core
  1. If you can read code and know how to compile the code from github, download it, use a new USB Stick to transfer it to a literally virgin computer which will be airgapped, and compile it and use it there.
  2. If you can't read code and don't know how to compile stuff, download the binary file from bitcoin.org and hashcheck it. Don't just compare the hash with the text file you downloaded from bitcoin.org. Check out the hashes posted by all the core developers on Github.
  3. Write down the generated Key Pairs on a paper with a waterproof ink and store it somewhere safe. Engraving the Key Pairs on a metal strip and storing it in a safe is also a good idea in case of fire. You can also print it out but, be sure to use a printer that doesn't have wifi and doesn't have a memory that can store data, and don't let anyone use it. Also back up the Key Pairs in an encrypted USB Stick and tell your family to take it in case of fire, so that even if the safe is destroyed, you would still have the Key Pairs.
For those of you "buying" bitcoins at Exchanges.
  1. I've never used an Exchange because they ask for the email and stuff to create an account and I live in a very poor closed country so, I cannot sign up there (I don't really know how I can buy bitcoin since I literally live in the middle of nowhere. It doesn't support international credit cards, debit cards, paypal, nothing.. I'd be very very happy if you'd donate some bitcoin to me. 1GaCyMgNbvVatrn9UBxn24MZ6NgXztTPPB If begging for donations is frowned upon, really please let me know and I'll erase it.), but as far as I know, when you "buy" your bitcoin there, you don't own your bitcoin yet until you transfer them to your actual Address. So, when you buy from the exchange, please transfer the bitcoin into your actual Address. You don't own your bitcoin if you don't know the private keys. I heard that Coinbase is insured, but still, actually having the bitcoin in your Address is better.
  2. Buying from ATMs is the best, I think. Also, buy in small amounts. For example, if you want to buy a $500 worth of bitcoin, instead of buying it in one go at the ATM, buy for $100 ten times.
Further look into the "virgin" computer
  1. If it's an old computer, it's not "virgin"
  2. Even if you format the hard drive, some viruses/malwares can still survive. And there are still viruses/malwares that can stay on the motherboard and bios.
  3. What if those viruses/malwares generate predictable Private Keys for you? What if those viruses/malwares generates already known Key Pairs for you? The keys won't escape the computer, but you'd be using the malicious individual's keys.
If you don't know much about Bitcoin because you're still studying it to have the technical knowledge,
  1. First, learn security - make sure you know how to create secure-enough Key Pairs first. You can study how the Bitcoin network works later, after you've bought some bitcoin. Learn more while you're holding.
  2. Second, learn about Game Theory, and incentives, so that even if you don't have the technical knowledge, you can make risk assessments and choose who you can trust.
  3. Continue learning about cryptography - interesting stuff like hashes, RSA, SHA's, SSL Certificates, signing, trust chains, etc. I think know these will help you understand more about crytocurrency. May be as cryptocurrency gets mainstream, you'd be able to make a career out of it, who knows? You'd be one of the pioneers if you start studying it right now. Also learn more about processors and harware so that hardware companies wouldn't be able to screw you over.
Sorry if it's not complete. I'll continue to learn more about security, bitcoin and how cryptology works, improve my English and may be post more in the future."
(I was never a fanboy of Bitcoin and apparently they don't want to encourage rational thinking. I'm an open-minded beginner and I like to learn about other cryptocurrencies as well, which is why I'm here, guys. But I left that dishonest sub for good. The amount of ignorant people in there is staggering!
Edit - Oh I see. They don't want to encourage average Joes to learn the proper method of creating keypairs and properly storing bitcoin. They want people to store their money on exchanges I see lol)
submitted by CasualManhaha to btc [link] [comments]

12 Reasons to Invest in Primecoin

‎1- Primecoin‬ is the First non Hash-Cash PoW Crypto-Currency.
2- Naturally Scarce
3- Very fast confirmations - 1min/block
4- Elastic supply
5- Primecoin is sustainable
6- Primecoin is currently the “fairest” coin to mine
7- Primecoin can introduce new participants to the new digital economy
8- Proof-of-work cryptos will gradually transition toward energy-multiuse, ie providing both security & technological computing values. And Primecoin is the pioneer in this realm.
9- Primecoin has anti-centralization features
10- Primecoin captures the Wasted Energy of Bitcoin's Algorithm - The mining is actually useful
11- Primecoin has direct by-products
12- Primecoin has been developed by Sunny King, one of the most talented crypto-technologists of the rank of Satoshi Nakamoto
submitted by crypto_coiner to primecoin [link] [comments]

4A Coin Whitepaper

4A Coin: A web-based cryptocurrency network. Summary~ Because the first generation cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin distribute the money issuing task according to the power of machines such as GPU and CPU, they accumulate the payments in the mempool and they mine by changing the nonce number randomly or by continuously increasing it and trying repeatedly until they find a hash summary that matches the difficulty they specify, instead of processing the payments made in real-time instantly. This solution is ingenious if you want to use digital currency as a value storage tool. But when you try to use these digital currencies to pay for coffee or purchase a product online, it stands out as a disadvantage since you have to pay commissions to those miners and have to wait too long. As you know, the power of large payment solutions, such as Paypal or Western Union, comes from their servers and software. We also started working on a noncentralized, blockchain-protected end-toend (P2P) cryptocurrency that works as a web service. In such a case, for the system to survive and ensure security, instead of paying for the server cost, we set up a system where servers, that are nodes in the system, can get paid, provided they just stay online for 44 hours instead of mining. People get paid for a useful service they provide instead of wasting their time. There will be a reason for people to install this system on their servers because they are rewarded as long as they remain as servers. When people send an end-to-end payment, the servers, by finding a summary of this payment (They find this summary in order for all systems to meet at a common point and validate payments, and because it is a necessity of the blockchain architecture), ending with 4A, including the time, the sender, the receiver, amount, summary of the previous transaction and the data contained in a digital signature indicating that the sender is actually sending it, without any difficulty and they add it to their databases. Because there are no such concepts as block size or mining involved in any way, the registration process is completed instantly. We use a task queue management library called Celery Project, which is used by companies such as Instagram and Mozilla to prevent complication that may occur if 100 transactions take place within the same second. Security~ If you noticed when you entered the site, I told you that it was safer than Visa. This may seem an ambitious sentence for many, but if you actually know what you're doing when you buy a product online, you are aware of the risks involved. Risk & Problem~ When you type information in the payment form, such as credit card, CVV, and so on, malicious people on the web can read the data you send through these forms. Just because of this, payment solutions require you to add an SSL certificates to your site. These SSL certificates actually save your data using cryptography and protect it until it reaches the recipient. Well, what if the seller has bad intentions? Solution~ 4A Coin encrypts your payments using the Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) and sends a signature confirming that you want to pay instead of giving your digital password to the network. This is actually the idea of Satoshi Nakamoto and it is known as P2PKH in Bitcoin. So if we actually compare 4A Coin to a credit card, then no one will ever see your credit card details. In addition, SSL certificate is no longer needed because a malicious user who can tap into your network seeing your payment signature won't change anything, besides it is already publicly shared everywhere. Thus, we have already gotten rid of certificate issues like security and SSL in the first place. Commission Solution~ When you benefit from a local payment solution, you will have to pay a commission to the companies you work with, between 5% and 20% of your sales. The coins you use in 4A Coin are already generated by the nodes, so they do not ask for a commission. Thanks to this, you do not pay commissions for transactions nor for any other reason. Wallets ~ wallet_id ~ 4A01eaedb37fc09fdb94c6d632adf9f63d private_key ~ cbc949239a333559f5dd8b0b5cf3d32923c2cab3 7c2bde9c8042a3dafe59a6b9 Your wallet is actually an ECDSA key pair. At first, we used RSA for this, but we had to switch to ECDAS because the keys were too long in the RSA and were taking too much space. Users have public keys, private keys, and wallet addresses created by processing public keys. Public key is not visible to users on the system. Instead, they will see a short version of a summary generated by public key processing as their wallet. def generate_wallet_from_pkey(public_key): binmnmn = public_key.encode('utf-8') first_step = 34 - len(settings.CURRENCY) wallet_id = hashlib.sha256(binmnmn).hexdigest() wallet_id = wallet_id[-first_step:] wallet_id = "".join((settings.CURRENCY, wallet_id)) return wallet_id This function simply creates a wallet from the simply given public key's SHA-256 summary. Public keys are required for the approval of digital signatures, so it is necessary to keep the public key in transactions. Payments~ When a user makes a payment, the payment time (in epoch format & GMT), the sender's address, the recipient's address, the summary of the previous transaction and the amount sent are transferred to a dictionary. This dictionary can be sorted differently on different computers, and to prevent this, the contents of this dictionary must be organized in a way that is ordered from A to Z, and will give the same result in everyone. data = collections.OrderedDict(sorted(data.items())) With the above code, we can create a stable dictionary that can work globally. Finally, we take a summary of this dictionary and record it in our database, and broadcast it to other servers that we have recorded it. Peer to Peer~ We use the TCP port and web socket technology to ensure that the system is P2P. For the script to work, you need to use Python3. Because, we use the Twister Matrix Library and the Autobahn Python libraries to provide real time transactions. The port we use globally is the 9000th port. There are 3 different types of broadcasting in real time processes: The first one is “Hi, I'm a new node, please add me to your network” and the other one is “Hi, I'm a new process, please verify me”. This is parsed on the server side and necessary actions are taken. The third broadcasting type will be explained in the proof of cloud section. Mining ~ A total of 450 million of 4A Coins will be issued with 300.000.000 Pre-mined. 150 million coins will be mined by a method called Proof of Cloud. Proof of Cloud~ Proof of Cloud or POC refers to a method of earning based on time as a server instead of mining. Each node, by staying online for 44 hours, will send a message as "I have been online for 44 hours, so check my database to see if I have been online by reviewing my recent transactions." If it proves that you have approved transactions for the last 44 hours, you will be eligible to receive the reward. Celery & Redis~ We use Celery, a library that automatically controls tasks so that certain processes can be repeated at certain times in the system. Celery needs Redis to work. Redis is an open source NoSQL (NoSQL is the name given to database systems that store “non-relational” data schematically. NoSQL is literally being used in the sense of "not-only- SQL", which means "only SQL is not used".) software written on Linux as the pure version. Keeping the system up and running~ We use Gunicorn 'Green Unicorn' and Nginx, the Python WSI HTTP Server, to ensure that the system can handle high load and maintain its endurance; Nginx is a Web server designed to focus on high concurrency, high performance and low memory usage. It can also be used as a reverse proxy server, load balancer, and HTTP cache. We were actually using Supervisord to keep all these systems up and running, but since Supervisord did not work with Python3 we started using Circusd developed by the Mozilla Foundation and we were more satisfied with it than Supervisiord. It is much easier to install and use, requires Tornado framework to work on its own, and works correctly with the 4.5.3 version of Tornado. This version is already installed automatically in requirements.txt, but it is important that you know this detail.
submitted by 4acoin to u/4acoin [link] [comments]

4A Coin Whitepaper

4A Coin: A web-based cryptocurrency network. Summary~ Because the first generation cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin distribute the money issuing task according to the power of machines such as GPU and CPU, they accumulate the payments in the mempool and they mine by changing the nonce number randomly or by continuously increasing it and trying repeatedly until they find a hash summary that matches the difficulty they specify, instead of processing the payments made in real-time instantly. This solution is ingenious if you want to use digital currency as a value storage tool. But when you try to use these digital currencies to pay for coffee or purchase a product online, it stands out as a disadvantage since you have to pay commissions to those miners and have to wait too long. As you know, the power of large payment solutions, such as Paypal or Western Union, comes from their servers and software. We also started working on a noncentralized, blockchain-protected end-toend (P2P) cryptocurrency that works as a web service. In such a case, for the system to survive and ensure security, instead of paying for the server cost, we set up a system where servers, that are nodes in the system, can get paid, provided they just stay online for 44 hours instead of mining. People get paid for a useful service they provide instead of wasting their time. There will be a reason for people to install this system on their servers because they are rewarded as long as they remain as servers. When people send an end-to-end payment, the servers, by finding a summary of this payment (They find this summary in order for all systems to meet at a common point and validate payments, and because it is a necessity of the blockchain architecture), ending with 4A, including the time, the sender, the receiver, amount, summary of the previous transaction and the data contained in a digital signature indicating that the sender is actually sending it, without any difficulty and they add it to their databases. Because there are no such concepts as block size or mining involved in any way, the registration process is completed instantly. We use a task queue management library called Celery Project, which is used by companies such as Instagram and Mozilla to prevent complication that may occur if 100 transactions take place within the same second. Security~ If you noticed when you entered the site, I told you that it was safer than Visa. This may seem an ambitious sentence for many, but if you actually know what you're doing when you buy a product online, you are aware of the risks involved. Risk & Problem~ When you type information in the payment form, such as credit card, CVV, and so on, malicious people on the web can read the data you send through these forms. Just because of this, payment solutions require you to add an SSL certificates to your site. These SSL certificates actually save your data using cryptography and protect it until it reaches the recipient. Well, what if the seller has bad intentions? Solution~ 4A Coin encrypts your payments using the Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) and sends a signature confirming that you want to pay instead of giving your digital password to the network. This is actually the idea of Satoshi Nakamoto and it is known as P2PKH in Bitcoin. So if we actually compare 4A Coin to a credit card, then no one will ever see your credit card details. In addition, SSL certificate is no longer needed because a malicious user who can tap into your network seeing your payment signature won't change anything, besides it is already publicly shared everywhere. Thus, we have already gotten rid of certificate issues like security and SSL in the first place. Commission Solution~ When you benefit from a local payment solution, you will have to pay a commission to the companies you work with, between 5% and 20% of your sales. The coins you use in 4A Coin are already generated by the nodes, so they do not ask for a commission. Thanks to this, you do not pay commissions for transactions nor for any other reason. Wallets ~ wallet_id ~ 4A01eaedb37fc09fdb94c6d632adf9f63d private_key ~ cbc949239a333559f5dd8b0b5cf3d32923c2cab3 7c2bde9c8042a3dafe59a6b9 Your wallet is actually an ECDSA key pair. At first, we used RSA for this, but we had to switch to ECDAS because the keys were too long in the RSA and were taking too much space. Users have public keys, private keys, and wallet addresses created by processing public keys. Public key is not visible to users on the system. Instead, they will see a short version of a summary generated by public key processing as their wallet. def generate_wallet_from_pkey(public_key): binmnmn = public_key.encode('utf-8') first_step = 34 - len(settings.CURRENCY) wallet_id = hashlib.sha256(binmnmn).hexdigest() wallet_id = wallet_id[-first_step:] wallet_id = "".join((settings.CURRENCY, wallet_id)) return wallet_id This function simply creates a wallet from the simply given public key's SHA-256 summary. Public keys are required for the approval of digital signatures, so it is necessary to keep the public key in transactions. Payments~ When a user makes a payment, the payment time (in epoch format & GMT), the sender's address, the recipient's address, the summary of the previous transaction and the amount sent are transferred to a dictionary. This dictionary can be sorted differently on different computers, and to prevent this, the contents of this dictionary must be organized in a way that is ordered from A to Z, and will give the same result in everyone. data = collections.OrderedDict(sorted(data.items())) With the above code, we can create a stable dictionary that can work globally. Finally, we take a summary of this dictionary and record it in our database, and broadcast it to other servers that we have recorded it. Peer to Peer~ We use the TCP port and web socket technology to ensure that the system is P2P. For the script to work, you need to use Python3. Because, we use the Twister Matrix Library and the Autobahn Python libraries to provide real time transactions. The port we use globally is the 9000th port. There are 3 different types of broadcasting in real time processes: The first one is “Hi, I'm a new node, please add me to your network” and the other one is “Hi, I'm a new process, please verify me”. This is parsed on the server side and necessary actions are taken. The third broadcasting type will be explained in the proof of cloud section. Mining ~ A total of 450 million of 4A Coins will be issued with 300.000.000 Pre-mined. 150 million coins will be mined by a method called Proof of Cloud. Proof of Cloud~ Proof of Cloud or POC refers to a method of earning based on time as a server instead of mining. Each node, by staying online for 44 hours, will send a message as "I have been online for 44 hours, so check my database to see if I have been online by reviewing my recent transactions." If it proves that you have approved transactions for the last 44 hours, you will be eligible to receive the reward. Celery & Redis~ We use Celery, a library that automatically controls tasks so that certain processes can be repeated at certain times in the system. Celery needs Redis to work. Redis is an open source NoSQL (NoSQL is the name given to database systems that store “non-relational” data schematically. NoSQL is literally being used in the sense of "not-only- SQL", which means "only SQL is not used".) software written on Linux as the pure version. Keeping the system up and running~ We use Gunicorn 'Green Unicorn' and Nginx, the Python WSI HTTP Server, to ensure that the system can handle high load and maintain its endurance; Nginx is a Web server designed to focus on high concurrency, high performance and low memory usage. It can also be used as a reverse proxy server, load balancer, and HTTP cache. We were actually using Supervisord to keep all these systems up and running, but since Supervisord did not work with Python3 we started using Circusd developed by the Mozilla Foundation and we were more satisfied with it than Supervisiord. It is much easier to install and use, requires Tornado framework to work on its own, and works correctly with the 4.5.3 version of Tornado. This version is already installed automatically in requirements.txt, but it is important that you know this detail.
submitted by 4acoin to u/4acoin [link] [comments]

Show me a person who knows as much or more than me about Bitcoin, and profusely thinks it's not going anywhere.

Posting this question has been on my todo list and I had the same investor emotion that so many people have to deal with, I didn't want to post it because I might find out bad news!! Well, it's something any investor of any kind should do. Find out if there are any threats.
For people to properly answer this they need to know what I know and how well I know it. Because the arguments against will be comeing from different knowledge sets, I want the arguments against to know what I know plus all their extra info. Admittingly, this is only 6 months of studying so it shouldn't be too hard for you veterans.
Base knowledge: Hummm jeeesus christ this is an impractical......Fuck...Base knowledge, specific knowledge, investor knowledge, socioeconomics, internet, programming.....what was I thinking....hummm knowledge of human history...gold mining history and Gold industry finances, and characteristics of money. Ok, change of mind, not going to explain anything.
Who the fuck knows everything about Bitcoin and still has good arguments against it? That's better.
Literally, you know everything about Bitcoin. You've hung out with Gavin Anderson in person and might have been in the same room with Satoshi Nakamoto cause you were at Bitcoin 2011; or 10 if there was one. You have read the open source Bitcoin code on GitHub and remember every line like it was the first time you had sex. You understand that shit like Lawnmower man. You know that RSA encryption was first discovered by the military around World War 2's end then independently rediscovered by 3 math scientists in 1977(straight off of Khan academy). You laugh at people who think they understand and are comfortable with this shit cause they finally grasped RSA encryption. You have obviously mined and sometimes get your 6 year old kid to do prime factorizations. SHA 256 is your bitch and when the US recently(2days ago?) publicly said NSA has super decryption ability and backdoor access to your bum; you didn't flinch. No really, you were one of the few that didn't even question the fact that they would need 100 years with all the worlds computers to crack one address. You never phoned one of your more experienced electrical engineering genius friends to confirm certain aspects. You get the point.
In my opinion the only remaining hurdle is brick and mortar adoption and that seems to be happening at an increasing pace, as long as that pace continues or increases, I don't foresee Bitcoin failing to replace a significant portion of our planets' current forms of money or all of them :). I track this progess by literally watching how many places are on coinmap.org (and other maps out there). If all business on the planet accept Bitcoin, that map will continue growing. I make some assumptions of events that still need to happen, but believe they will happen as a consequence of brick and mortar adoption.
Begin!
(If you want quality answers, upvote this thread!)
EDIT: If you don't feel like getting harassed by all the zealots please pm me your opinions. I would love to learn about them.
submitted by RenSylvain to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hi, can someone please look at this protocol for exchanging RSA encrypted packets of Bitcoin keys and see if it is valid

UPDATE:
Massive thanks to rya_nc for analysing this
The problem
Two users Alice and Bob.
alice and bob each have a packet of data AES encrypted with a password only they know.
AliceAESPacket BobAESPacket 
The AESPackets contain an RSA key pair which they will use for encrypted communication with each other. The AESPackets also contains 3 Bitcoin BIP32 root public keys.
They will use these root keys to generate 3 derived bitcoin public keys whcih they will exchange with each other.
Their RSA public keys are available on a server.
The exchange
  1. Alice decrypts her AES encrypted packet with her password, gets the root keys and derives 3 public Bitcoin keys for Bob
    BitcoinKeyForBob1 = Bip32Hot.Derive(node); BitcoinKeyForBob2 = Bip32Cold.Derive(node); BitcoinKeyForBob3 = Bip32Us.Derive(node);
  2. She downloads Bob's RSA public key from the server and encrypts the 3 Bitcoin public keys using Bob's RSA public key. She signs the encrypted packet with her private RSA key.
    RSAEncryptedPacketForBob = BobRSAPublic.Encrypt(BitcoinKeyForBob1 + BitcoinKeyForBob2 + BitcoinKeyForBob3)
  3. Alice posts the encrypted packet to the server and Bob is notified that it is available
  4. Bob downloads the RSAEncryptedPacketForBob and decrypts with BobRSAPrivateKey.
  5. Bob verifies the signature against alice's public RSA key
  6. Bob then AES encrypts BitcoinKeyForBob1, BitcoinKeyForBob2 and BitcoinKeyForBob3 using his private password and stores in BobAESPacket
  7. The RSAEncryptedPacketForBob is deleted from the server.
  8. Out of band Bob and Alice validate RSA signatures, until this is done they cannot send funds
  9. Generating an address
    Bob decrypts his BobAESPacket using his password and derives an address for Alice using BitcoinKeyReceived1 + BitcoinKeyReceived2 + BitcoinKeyReceived3
Attack Vector
Eve intercepts step 4
  1. Alice posts the encrypted packet to the server >atack start>
    RSAEncryptedPacketForBob = BobRSAPublic.Encrypt(EveBitcoinKey1 + EveBitcoinKey2 + EveBitcoinKey3)
FAIL:: signature cannot be spoofed
atack end>>> and Bob is notified that it is available
submitted by Ninki-Ben to crypto [link] [comments]

The RSA Encryption Algorithm (1 of 2: Computing an Example) SHA256 Code Animation Quick Look: Crypto 101: Encryption, Codebreaking, SSL and Bitcoin Blockchain/Bitcoin for beginners 8: Bitcoin addresses, public key hash, P2PKH transactions Hashing with SHA1 Algorithm in C#

In bitcoin, integrity, block-chaining, and the hashcash cost-function all use SHA256 as the underlying cryptographic hash function. A cryptographic hash function essentially takes input data which can be of practically any size, and transforms it, in an effectively-impossible to reverse or to predict way, into a relatively compact string (in the case of SHA-256 the hash is 32 bytes). RSA encryption is a system that solves what was once one of the biggest problems in cryptography: How can you send someone a coded message without having an opportunity to previously share the code with them? This article will teach you everything you need to know about how RSA encryption was developed, how it works, the math behind it, what it is used for as well as some of the biggest ... SHA is not used in RSA. However, cryptographic protocols like SSL, SSH and others, use different algorithms like SHA and RSA for different purposes. SSL uses RSA (encryption) or DH (with RSA, DSA or ECDSA signature) for key negotiation and AES or 3DES for data encryption. In the PGP protocol/file format, RSA, DSA and ElGamal are used for ... Hi using SHA 1 with RSA encryption for ssl certificate is secure? As i know, sha 1 is not secure, but if we use RSA with sha1, still it will be an issue? Please suggest if any security issues exist. rsa sha. share improve this question follow asked Oct 11 '18 at 9:19. Veeru Veeru. 11 1 1 silver badge 1 1 bronze badge. you can't make a blanket statement like "sha1 is not secure"; it ... // Given that a hash is composed of non-text binary bytes, we'll set the Charset property equal to "base64" // (because we have the base64 hash from above). rsa. put_Charset ("base64"); // Note: The OAEP padding uses random bytes in the padding, and therefore each time encryption happens, // even using the same data and key, the result will be different -- but still valid.

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The RSA Encryption Algorithm (1 of 2: Computing an Example)

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. 📚📚📚📚📚📚📚📚 GOOD NEWS FOR COMPUTER ENGINEERS INTRODUCING 5 MINUTES ENGINEERING 🎓🎓🎓🎓🎓🎓🎓🎓 SUBJECT :- Discrete Mathematics (DM) Theory Of Computation (TOC ... Before we delve into the inner workings of a bitcoin transaction I wanted to explain how the actual bitcoin address is derived from the public key which in turn is derived from the private key. I ... Recover RSA private key from public keys - rhme2 Key Server (crypto 200) ... Hashing, Encryption, Blockchain & Bitcoin Mining with Python - Duration: 1:51:19. Yves Hilpisch 13,588 views. 1:51:19 ... The RSA Encryption Algorithm (1 of 2: Computing an Example) ... 8:40. sha 1 tutorial ,how sha 1 works, fips 180,secure hash algorithm tutorial - Duration: 9:09. Test-Info 5,034 views. 9:09 ...

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